Friday, 24 June 2016

Chicken Pesto Savoy Cabbage Wraps

Oh my gosh. 

This is the solution to your AIP and paleo packed lunches. Or even those lunches that I love the most - the 'schnaffling it all up straight from the kitchen worktop' lunches. 

Yum. 



Let me tell you how this recipe got invented. 

I was talking with some UK AIPers on one of the Facebook groups when I started to wonder about these Collard Wraps we keep seeing recipes for in the US. Now here in the UK, I've never been able to buy Collard Greens, so I wondered what they were called over here. As it turns out, our Spring Greens are the closest we have. But can I buy them? Nope. So I started to wonder whether you can make wraps with good old wrinkly, squeaky Savoy cabbage. I can get that all year round. 

Hmmm.... 




So I tried. And it was the best thing I've eaten in ages

I added in some leftover chicken I had in the fridge, some salad leaves with beetroot strips and some julienned raw carrot. I also lightly cooked the cabbage leaves and then cooled them quickly in cold water, so they're easier to wrap and easier on the digestion. I also had a bowl of my artichoke heart and basil pesto in the fridge, so dolloped a big spoonful of that all over, too. 

If you're on a low-FODMAP diet, these won't be for you - but you could use large lettuce leaves instead and wrap them around the filling. Use a basil pesto without artichokes or garlic though, too. 

I also didn't bother to cut out the tough stalk bit from the cabbage leaf. It's easier to wrap up without holes in, and on some of the leaves, it wasn't too bad - they were quite tender once cooked. But if you don't want to eat them the best idea is to nibble around them. 

If you're taking these to eat on the go, roll them up in some greaseproof paper or foil and twist the ends, like they do in Burrito shops. Because there's nothing gluey or starchy about cabbage leaves they don't really stay stuck and rolled up if they're bashing about inside your bag all morning. 




Chicken Pesto Savoy Cabbage Wraps
Makes 4
Ingredients
4 large leaves from a Savoy cabbage 
couple handfuls your favourite salad leaves (I used a beetroot salad)
1 carrot, peeled and julienned into strips (or grated)
couple handfuls cold, leftover cooked chicken
2-3 tsp artichoke heart and basil pesto

Method
First, strip off the large outer leaves from a Savoy cabbage. Give them a wash and put to one side. Bring a wide pan of water to a boil and then gently drop in the leaves. Push them down under the water with a spoon or fork and cook for 3-4 minutes, until bright green and tender. Drain them and then rinse in the pan with cold water. Allow to cool. 

Bring the leaves over to a chopping board and dry them on a clean kitchen towel. Put one on the board and scatter over some salad leaves, the carrot and chicken. Spoon over a little of the pesto and then start to wrap up the leaf. 

Fold over the edges (left and right) and then tightly wrap them up. Lay on the board with the seam-side down. Repeat with the other three leaves. Cut in half and serve. 




Liked this recipe? Connect with me on FacebookTwitterInstagram or Pinterest to stay in touch and tag me in if you've made any of the recipes from the blog. I love to see your creations! 

Are you interested in how to use herbs and spices on the autoimmune protocol? Check out my ebook SPICE, which contains over 90 fully AIP-compliant recipes including curries, stir-fries, salads, soups, desserts and drinks. It's in the Amazon Kindle store now!

I've entered this recipe into the Recipe Roundtable over at Phoenix Helix - go check it out for more AIP inspiration... 



Wednesday, 22 June 2016

Roasted Pork Leg with Cider Apple Sauce

You guys know how I feel about cider, right?

I'm talking hard cider - the fizzy, alcoholic drink. It's refreshing, cool and kind of tangy. And, in my mind, as long as the alcohol is cooked off, it's definitely paleo.  Don't tell me that prehistoric man never drank the juice of a fermented apple. And don't tell me they never got a bit tipsy as the sun set over Stonehenge. They totally did. 


That's what I think, anyway.

Although we should be a bit careful with alcohol, because SUGAR. 

But you can still cook with it... 


Roasted Pork Leg with Cider Apple Sauce - Paleo AIP


Plus, cider goes so well with roasted pork. I've cooked pork belly with cider and garlic, and felt that this combination needed more tinkering. And so I roasted some pork leg until a bit burnished and until the crackling was all crisp and made a tangy, cider-spiked apple sauce to go with it. 


Roasted Pork Leg with Cider Apple Sauce - Paleo AIP



The best part? It was so easy to make. 

I was sent the meat to make this recipe by Farmer's Choice, an online butcher that provides free-range meat as well as fish and other storecupboard staples. I've worked on recipes using their meat over the past year and a half and the quality has always been superb. Plus it comes frozen, so you just stick it straight in your freezer to defrost when you need it. 


Roasted Pork Leg with Cider Apple Sauce - Paleo AIP


Roasted Pork Leg with Cider Apple Sauce
Serves 4
Ingredients
1kg pork leg, boned and rolled
half a teaspoon salt
1 tbsp olive oil
3 large Bramley apples
a mugful of hard (alcoholic) cider
1 bay leaf
salt, to season

Method
First of all, turn your oven up to gas mark 9/240ºC/475ºF. Get out a roasting tray or dish and lay the pork leg on it, with the crackling side up. Gently dab the skin with a kitchen towel to dry it, and then sprinkle with the salt, rubbing it into the scored lines. Finish with a trickle of olive oil and rub all over the pork. 

Slide the pork into the very hot oven and cook for 20 minutes. After this time, turn it down to gas mark 4/180ºC/350ºF and continue to roast the pork leg for one hour and 20 minutes. 

Once the pork is cooked through (cut into it, or use a meat thermometer to make sure it's cooked all the way through and there is no pink remaining), lift it out onto a plate to rest while you quickly make the Cider Apple Sauce and the gravy. 

Peel, core and dice the Bramley apples (throwing away the core and the peel) and place into a small saucepan. Turn up the heat to medium and add half the cider. Simmer for about 10 minutes, stirring often, until the apple has broken down and the cider has almost evaporated. You will still have some cider in the apple sauce, but it will have reduced considerably. Turn off the heat, pour into a serving bowl and leave to cool slightly. 

Finally, pour the juices that have collected in the roasting dish when you roasted the pork into another saucepan. Add the rest of the cider and bring to a simmer. Drop in the bay leaf, season with a pinch of salt and simmer gently for 5 minutes. 

To serve, cut the crackling off the pork and chop it into four pieces. Slice the meat on a chopping board and place on plates with a piece of crackling. Pour the hot cider gravy over the pork and serve with your choice of vegetables and the Cider Apple Sauce. 


Roasted Pork Leg with Cider Apple Sauce - Paleo AIP autoimmune protocol


You might also like my Slow Cooked Pork Belly with Garlic and Cider.

Liked this recipe? Connect with me on FacebookTwitterInstagram or Pinterest to stay in touch and tag me in if you've made any of the recipes from the blog. I love to see your creations! 

Disclosure: I received the pork for this recipe, along with a contribution towards the cost of ingredients, from Farmer's Choice. Do check them out for meat, game, fish and other storecupboard items. 



Monday, 20 June 2016

Artichoke Heart and Basil Pesto

I've developed a bit of a habit of squeezing different vegetables into foods. It's more for my 8-year old than anyone else in the family, as she wrinkles her nose up at things like artichoke hearts, cabbage and asparagus. The solution? Add it to something else and blend it all up. 


Artichoke Heart and Basil Pesto - Nut free AIP Paleo Vegan


She will never know. 

But the idea for this pesto wasn't just to hide the artichokes. It was because I was looking for a coconut free way to make a creamy paleo, nut-free pesto that would also be AIP compliant. And I had a can of artichoke hearts in the cupboard, too. For those interested, artichoke hearts are a great source of fibre, magnesium, vitamin C and folate. 

So here it is. 

In my ebook SPICE, I developed a low-FODMAP pesto that doesn't contain garlic, nuts or dairy and it's gorgeous spooned onto chicken, salads and fish. 

This recipe isn't low-FODMAP. But if you can tolerate artichoke hearts it's really good. I know you'll love it. 

Artichoke Heart and Basil Pesto
Serves 4-6
Ingredients
3 small artichoke hearts, from a can
30g bunch of basil, leaves ripped off
3-4 tbsp extra virgin olive oil
juice of half a large lemon
pinch of salt, if needed

Method
Blend all the ingredients together until smooth and taste, adding a little more lemon juice or salt if needed. Spoon into a small serving bowl and serve straight away. Will keep, covered in the fridge, for 2-3 days. 

Liked this recipe? Connect with me on FacebookTwitterInstagram or Pinterest to stay in touch and tag me in if you've made any of the recipes from the blog. I love to see your creations! 

Are you interested in how to use herbs and spices on the autoimmune protocol? Check out my ebook SPICE, which contains over 90 fully AIP-compliant recipes including curries, stir-fries, salads, soups, desserts and drinks. It's in the Amazon Kindle store now!


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